Picture This: Eva and Sadie and the Worst Haircut Ever!

Publication Date: June 3, 2014

Publisher: Harper Collins

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Super cute story about the author’s children and a haircut that turned into a lesson for one child. 

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Six Traits: Voice:  Read aloud Eva and Sadie and the Worst Haircut EVER! and discuss Sadie’s voice with students.  How do we know she has a big personality?  What are some ways her personality shines through the voice of the character?  Use Eva and Sadie and the Worst Haircut EVER! as a mentor text to discuss the craft of voice.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review.

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

In New York by Marc Brown

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Part homage to Marc Brown’s beloved hometown and part travel guide, In New York is a great informational picture book about the largest city in the United States.  I especially enjoyed the illustrations and informational blurbs on the inside front and back cover.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Writer’s Workshop: Pair In New York with A Poem as Big as New York City to show two different mentor texts about New York City. Invite students to write a “travel guide” for their own city or a city/state/country that they might study. Encourage them to use In New York (or A Poem as Big as New York City: Little Kids Write About the Big Apple) as a model text for their own writing.

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan

Recommended Grades: 5-8

What if the rules of summer feel completely arbitrary? What if your older brother is the only one who gets to make them up all summer long?

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Making Inferences: Read aloud Rules of Summer and ask students what they notice. Read aloud the text again and ask if students notice anything different. Read aloud several times to guide students to make inferences about the meaning behind the story. What are the rules of summer really all about?

 

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.R

Hi, Koo! A Year of Seasons by Jon J Muth

Recommended Grades: 4-6

Using an adorable panda, Koo, Jon J. Muth challenges readers to stretch their minds and imaginations with twenty-six haiku about the four seasons. In the author’s note, Muth explains that haiku has evolved over time and now poets no longer adhere to the rigid structure of 5-7-5 syllables. Instead, Muth uses sensory images to capture a moment of emotion in words.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Author’s Craft/Word Choice: Read aloud Hi, Koo!: A Year of Seasons and discuss how haiku has evolved over time. Look at several of the haiku and talk about Muth’s use of sensory details instead of the typical 5-7-5 syllable structure. Using  Hi, Koo!: A Year of Seasons as a mentor text for author’s craft, encourage students to write haiku that develops through sensory images, instead of the traditional, rigid 5-7-5 syllable structure.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Galapagos George by Jean Craighead George

Recommended Grades: 4-6

This is the story of the famous Lonesome George, a giant tortoise who was the last of his species, lived to be one hundred years old, and became known as the rarest creature in the world.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Inquiry: I do not know much about the Galápagos Islands, and I certainly did not know George’s story before reading this. Read aloud Galapagos George as part of an inquiry project on animals or environmental studies. The book takes you through the evolution and adaptation of the species of domed tortoises and saddleback tortoises. If your students are looking for more information, encourage them to check out the informational page at the back of the book.

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

What Do You Do With An Idea? by Kobi Yamada

Recommended Grades: 4-6

A beautifully illustrated picture book with an inspiring message. This is the story of one brilliant idea and the child who helps bring it into the world.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Idea Development: Read aloud What Do You Do With an Idea? at the beginning of the year as you begin your writer’s workshop. This book is an excellent mentor text to build a community of writers, but also to kick off your writer’s workshop and help students develop their own ideas. After reading it aloud, discuss with students what happened to the idea in the story and how it relates to them as writers. Develop an anchor chart of what students might do with an idea when they come up with one. Display the anchor chart to help them as they develop their writing ideas throughout the year.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein by Jennifer Berne

Recommended Grades: 4-6

A picture book story of aspects of Einstein’s life, but mostly about how curiosity and wonder shows the powerful difference imagination can make in any life.

Lesson Idea


Mentor Text: Inquiry: Read aloud On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein at the beginning of an inquiry unit. Discuss how Einstein’s curiosity and wonder led him to genius inventions. Use On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein as a mentor text when developing inquisitive and curious students through units of inquiry. Pair this with other texts when developing units of inquiry.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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