Truth or Lie Series by Erica Perl

Recommended Grades: 2-4

Touted as 75% Truth + 25% Lies = 100% FUN! This new series makes the game “2 Truths and a Lie” educational!

Lesson Idea: 

Mentor Text: Determine Importance:  On one page in this early reader science series, Erica Perl provides readers with four statements about a topic.  Readers are asked to determine which one of the four statements is a lie.  The next page reveals the answer and provides detailed information about the true statements.  This series is a great mentor for students to determine importance in a text.  After reading texts about a different topic, students could use these texts as a model in order to write their own “Truth or Lie” book to demonstrate their understanding.

©2019 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Advertisements

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan

Recommended Grades: 5-8

What if the rules of summer feel completely arbitrary? What if your older brother is the only one who gets to make them up all summer long?

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Making Inferences: Read aloud Rules of Summer and ask students what they notice. Read aloud the text again and ask if students notice anything different. Read aloud several times to guide students to make inferences about the meaning behind the story. What are the rules of summer really all about?

 

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.R

Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Chester had his own way of doing things.  Chester’s best friend Wilson was exactly the same way.  That’s why they were best friends.  And then Lilly moved into the neighborhood…

Lesson Idea:  


Making Connections:   Read aloud Chester’s Way and discuss the text-to-self connections that you can make to the book.  This is a great model text for making connections.  Chester’s Way is also a great model text to make text-to-text connections.  There are several other Henkes books that have the same characters  that make great model texts.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

The Mysteries of Harris Burdick by Chris Van Allsburg

Recommended Grades: 2-6

In the introduction, we learn that Chris Van Allsburg saw the drawings in this book at the home of Peter Wenders.  Wenders once worked for a children’s book publisher.  Thirty years ago, a man called Mr. Wender’s office, introducing himself as Harris Burdick and leaving 14 drawings with a title and caption for each one.  Burdick promised to return the next day with the stories he had written to go with each picture.  Mr. Burdick was never heard from again. . .

Lesson Idea:

Comprehension Strategies:


Making Inferences: Read aloud The Mysteries of Harris Burdick as part of a unit on making inferences.  Provide students with a picture and ask them to infer what is happening in the picture.  Use this book after modeling and making inferences with other books.     

Six Traits

Idea Development: After reading aloud The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, have students choose a picture from the book and using the first line that is written, continue the story.  How do they envision the story?


Note: Recently many popular children’s authors came together and wrote stories based on these pictures in The Chronicles of Harris Burdick: Fourteen Amazing Authors Tell the Tales / With an Introduction by Lemony Snicket.  After students write their own stories based on the pictures, share some of the author’s ideas and how they envisioned the story. 

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Alexander receives money from his grandparents and really wants to keep it, but does he?    

Lesson Idea:

Reading Workshop


Comprehension Strategies: Making Inferences: Read aloud Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday and model how to infer what characters are feeling based on the pictures and text.  Create a t-chart that says Text Clues and Inference and use it as a guide to scaffold for students (or What the Picture Shows/Inference).  Once you’ve modeled, provide students the opportunity to make inferences with a partner (use a different book) using the t-chart.  Eventually, have students make inferences as they read without the t-chart.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.