Light in the Darkness: A Story about How Slaves Learned in Secret by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Based on historical fact, Rosa and her mother, both slaves, sneak away at night to go to “pit school.”  This is where slaves learn to read and write.  An interesting piece of American history told in a beautifully illustrated story.  

Lesson Idea:  


Content Connections/Inquiry Study: Read aloud Light in the Darkness: A Story about How Slaves Learned in Secret.  Use this book if working on an inquiry unit on slavery or the Civil War. Students could use this as a resource to understand how schooling was not a norm for slaves.  Ask how slaves went about learning how to read when they weren’t allowed.  Pair this book with Words Set Me Free.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Advertisements

Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford

Recommended Grades: 4-6

Uma feels small when she looks up at the night sky.  She begins to wonder about infinity and what it is/means.  Uma asks her friends and family what infinity means, but she has to find out what it means to her. 

Lesson Idea:  


Content Connection:  In an effort to help students develop number sense, read aloud Infinity and Me and discuss how infinity meant something different to each character.  Ask  your students to define what infinity means to them.  Have them visualize and/or draw what it means.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the author for review.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Using his grandfather’s story as a backdrop, Say bridges the gap between two cultures, Japanese and American.  He tells the story of his grandfather who learned to love both cultures and invariably miss one when he was living in the other country. 

Lesson Idea:  


Content Connections/Immigration/Multiple perspectives: Read aloud Grandfather’s Journey and discuss how the author and his grandfather’s perspective are both evident.  Use this as a model text to determine how one might feel when immigrating to a new country.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Dear Benjamin Banneker by Andrea Davis Pinkney

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A picture book biography of Benjamin Banneker, who was born free when most blacks were still enslaved.  An accomplished astronomer and mathematician, author of the first published almanac by a black man, Banneker decided to take a stand against slavery.  This is a story of his correspondence with Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson. 

Lesson Idea:  


Biography Mentor Text: Read aloud Dear Benjamin Banneker and discuss the components of the biography.  Biographies can take many shapes and this one is written in part through actual letters.  Connect this book with Molly Bannaky.  Use this book as a model during a study of biographies or during a study of history.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Molly Bannaky by Alice McGill

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A picture book biography of Molly Walsh, a young English dairymaid brought before the court in 1683 for stealing milk.  She was sentenced to work as an indentured servant in an American colony. This becomes a story of a remarkable woman and her courage, determination, and vision (and a surprise connection to a historical figure).    


Lesson Idea:  

Biography Mentor Text: Read aloud Molly Bannaky and discuss the components of the biography and the surprise ending (Molly’s connection to a historical figure).  Use this book as a model during a study of biographies or during a study of history.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.