Feathers: Not Just for Flying by Melissa Stewart

Feathers: Not Just for Flying is a Maryland Black Eyed Susan Award nominee for 2016.

Recommended Grades:   3-5

Feathers aren’t just for flying. . . In this scrapbook-like nonfiction picture book, Stewart introduces sixteen types of birds and compares their feathers to everyday objects teaching readers just how practical their feathers can be. 

Lesson Idea:

Mentor Text: Writer’s Craft: Before sharing Feathers: Not Just for Flying as a mentor text, read aloud the author’s note.  In it, Stewart shares how she researches for her books and develops the concepts that make her books more engaging.  Encourage students to use Feathers: Not Just for Flying as a model text when they are researching and writing their own informational texts.  Consider both the scrap-book and the comparison models as possible mentors for students.

©2016 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break if You Want to Survive the School Bus by John Grandits

Recommended Grades:3-5

Kyle is dreading his first trip aboard the school bus, but his big brother James is an expert.  James gives Kyle ten rules for riding the bus if he wants to avoid getting laughed at or yelled at, pushed around, or even pounded.  

Lesson Idea:


Six Traits Mentor Text: Organization:  Read aloud Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break if You Want to Survive the School Bus and discuss the organization style of the author (a list of sorts).  Let students choose the topic or provide them with a content area for which to write a list.  Encourage students to mimic the style in a piece of writing, perhaps “Ten Rules to Survive Recess” or “Ten Rules to Survive the Cafeteria.”

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Sophie’s Fish by A.E. Cannon

Recommended Grades:3-5

How hard can it be to babysit a fish?  That’s what Jake thinks when Sophie asks him to take care of Yo-Yo for the weekend.  Then Jake starts to over think what it means to take care of a fish. 

Lesson Idea:


Six Traits Mentor Text: Organization:  Read aloud Sophie’s Fish as part of a unit on the craft of endings.  Sophie’s Fish is a great example of a surprise ending, but the illustrator shares the surprise, not the author.  Read aloud other mentor texts that demonstrate surprise endings.  Encourage students to write a surprise ending for one of their writing pieces.      

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Crankee Doodle by Tom Angleberger

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Find out why Yankee was so cranky in this hilarious take on the traditional song. 

 

Lesson Idea:


Six Traits: Organization, Writer’s Workshop: Dialogue: Read aloud Crankee Doodle (makes a fun read aloud!).  Use this book as a mentor text for organization – fun surprise ending or a mentor text for dialogue.  How does the author show dialogue in this book? Group Crankee Doodle with other books with different examples of dialogue, such as, I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen, Big Plans by Bob Shea, One Cool Friend by Toni Buzzeo, and Cat Secrets by Jef Czekaj to share how different authors display dialogue in ways other than with traditional quotation marks. 

 

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Duncan just wants to color, but when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters all saying the same thing: We quit! 

Lesson Idea:  


Mentor Text: Letter Writing/Voice:  Read aloud The Day the Crayons Quit and discuss the voice of each crayon.  What do you learn about the individual crayons from each letter?  How do they feel and behave? Create a chart noting the character traits for each color.  Have students write a piece from a specific color’s point of view – using the character traits of the colors to guide them.  The book is written in letter form, so this is also a good model for letter writing.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.