Curious Critters by David FitzSimmons

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Portraits of a range of remarkable, bizarre, and often amusing creatures commonly found throughout North America with information related to the reader told from their point of view!


Lesson Idea:

Nonfiction Poetry Writing

Writer’s Workshop Mentor Text/Point of View: Read aloud Curious Critters and discuss how the author took true information and told it through poems.  Each critter shares his story from his point of view using onomatopoeia and other poetic elements.  Actual photographs of the animals complete the text.  Provide time for students to write nonfiction poems about a topic.  Encourage them to take/use photographs to go along with their poetry.     

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reversible Verse by Marilyn Singer

Recommended Grades: 4-6

A book of poems about fairy tales, written in reverso.  Two poems, you read one up and one down. 

Lesson Idea:


Poetry/Point of view: Read aloud Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reversible Verse and discuss how when you read one poem it tells you the point of view of one character, but when you read the second poem, it tells the point of view of the other character with only a few changes in capitalization or punctuation (ONLY).  In an author’s note, she explains how she played around with this technique to create reverso.  Have students use the same technique to describe two character’s points of view from a novel they read or even two points of view of historical figures during a period of time.

Extensions: Use this book/activity with George vs. George (for content connections) or Voices in the Park (for point of view connections)

©2011 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Voices in the Park by Anthony Browne

Recommended Grades: 4-6


Voices in the Park follows four characters as they take a walk in the park.  Each character provides his own point of view of the events that take place. 

 This is a great model text to demonstrate point of view.  Each character has his own point of view of the events in the park, that come together to make a whole story.  Additionally, each character has a distinct voice – one is snobby, one is despondent, one is lonely, and one is fun. 

Lesson Idea:

Point of View:  Read aloud this text and use it as a model to demonstrate point of view. After students have had ample models of point of view, ask them to write their own piece that combines several points of view into one story.    

Voice: Read aloud this text as a model for voice.  Discuss how each character has a distinct voice based on his circumstances.  Analyze how the author uses word choice to convey voice.  After students have had practice with writing with voice, ask students to create a character sketch that provides background information on a character.  Then ask students to take that background information and determine what the character’s voice might sound like.               

©2011 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.