Library Mouse by Daniel Kirk

May Theme: Engaging the Reluctant Reader/Writer

Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read or write.  Though it’s the end of the school year (for most), it’s never too late to try to entice a new reader or writer.  This month, I will share books that explore reading and writing as a topic.

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Library Mouse is an adorable book to read aloud to students.  I suggest using it to model genres.  Or use it todemonstrate for students how there is an author in each of us.  Sam, the Mouse, lives in the Children’s Section of the library.  He loves to read and one day decides to write a book.  He places his book on the shelf for the children to find.

Lesson idea: The author discusses several genres in this book.  Read it aloud as an introduction to genre study.  Sam the Mouse also writes books in different genres.  Read aloud this book as an introduction to genre study in writer’s workshop as well.  Have students write their own books around different genres, just like the students in the story.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

The Best Story by Eileen Spinelli

May Theme: Engaging the Reluctant Reader/Writer

Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read or write.  Though it’s the end of the school year (for most), it’s never too late to try to entice a new reader or writer.  This month, I will share books that explore reading and writing as a topic.

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Six Traits: Ideas

The Best Story is a great book to model for students where ideas come from.  The narrator of the story wants to write the “best story” to win a prize with her favorite author.  She enlists the help of her family members for ideas, but nothing seems quite right.  Her mother reminds her that the best stories come from the heart.

Lesson idea: Often times students have a difficult time writing when they have a choice, because they can’t come up with ideas.  Read aloud this book to students (particularly your reluctant writers) and remind them that the best stories come from the heart.  Provide an opportunity for students to explore their hearts and list writing seeds.  Model for them how to turn one seed into a story.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

The Jellybeans and the Big Book Bonanza by Laura Numeroff and Nate Evans

May Theme: Engaging the Reluctant Reader

Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read.  Though it’s the end of the school year (for most), it’s never too late to try to entice a new reader.  This month, I will share books that explore reading as a topic.

Recommended Grades: K-2  

The Jellybeans and the Big Book Bonanza is another great book that demonstrates the power of reading.  Similar to Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I don’t), Anna and her friends must find a book about a thing they love to write a book report.  All of her friends find one, will Anna?

Lesson idea: Have your own “Big Book Bonanza.”  Ask students to choose their own favorite topic, find a book related to it, and create an interesting book project about it.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I don’t) by Barbara Bottner

May Theme: Engaging the Reluctant Reader

Sometimes all it takes is one book to engage a child who may be reluctant to read.  Though it’s the end of the school year (for most), it’s never too late to try to entice a new reader.  This month, I will share books that explore reading as a topic.

Recommended Grades: K-2

Miss Brooks Loves Books (And I Don’t) is a great book to show children that not everyone enjoys reading, but there is a book in the library for everyone.  

Lesson idea: After reading aloud this book, discuss with students the idea that everyone usually has one book that may have turned them on to reading.  Remind students that perhaps some of them have not found that book yet, but you will help them.  Have students choose their favorite book (or help them find that one book that may turn them on to reading) and create a costume of the main character.  Celebrate “Book Week” in your own class and have students “really show why they love it.”

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.