Twenty-Odd Ducks: Why, every punctuation mark counts! by Lynne Truss

March Theme:  Six Traits Mentor Texts

This month, my focus will be on books that can be used as mentor texts when teaching the Six Traits of Writing.

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Six Traits:  Conventions

Twenty-Odd Ducks: Why, every punctuation mark counts! is a fantastic resource to teach students how the placement of a punctuation mark can alter the meaning of a sentence. The author demonstrates this by modeling two different sentences and color coding the different punctuation.  The illustrations aid the reader in understanding the difference between the two sentences.

Additional books in this series:

The Girl’s Like Spaghetti: Why, You Can’t Manage without Apostrophes!

Eats, Shoots & Leaves: Why, Commas Really Do Make a Difference!

Lesson idea: Read aloud this book and/or the additional books in the series.  Point out how the punctuation changes the meaning of the sentence.  Discuss the pictures and how the pictures show different meaning as well.  When children are familiar with specific punctuation marks and their uses, have each student write two sentences that use the same punctuation marks differently and illustrate each sentence.  Bind each child’s work together into a class punctuation resource book.

If you are looking for additional resources and ways to teach conventions to students, please read the post I wrote about Punctuation Celebration or the post I wrote on The web files.

**Note** I provide these lesson ideas under the assumption that you are familiar with The Six Traits of Writing.  If you are not, and would like more information about teaching students about conventions or any other six traits component, please feel free to contact me at Dlittle[at]linkstoliteracy[dot]com.  I am happy to provide more specific lessons or resources if necessary.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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Spot the Plot: A Riddle Book of Book Riddles by J. Patrick Lewis

March Theme:  Six Traits Mentor Texts

This month, my focus is on books that can be used as mentor texts when teaching the Six Traits of Writing.

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Six Traits:  Organization

I loved Spot the Plot: A Riddle Book of Book Riddles at first glance!  The author took a mix of thirteen current books and classics and wrote a riddle to describe each book.

An Example:  “A magical telling, a pig for the selling, a spider is spelling out words that amaze. . .”

Lesson idea: Read aloud this book and have fun with it.  See if your students can guess the answer to the riddle (this may be difficult for younger students who don’t have the background knowledge of some of the books).  You may want to choose to only read the riddles that you think your students will know.  After, have students practice writing riddles to describe a book they have read.  Have students determine the book based on the riddle.  Organize all of the riddles together into a class book.

**Note** I provide these lesson ideas under the assumption that you are familiar with The Six Traits of Writing.  If you are not, and would like more information about teaching students about organizaion or any other six traits component, please feel free to contact me at Dlittle[at]linkstoliteracy[dot]com.  I am happy to provide more specific lessons or resources if necessary.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Everything Spring by Jill Esbaum

March Theme:  Six Traits Mentor Texts

This month, my focus will be on books that can be used as mentor texts when teaching the Six Traits of Writing.

Recommended Grades: K-2

Six Traits:  Word Choice

This book provides readers with the sights and sounds of spring which creates a perfect opportunity to tie in sensory details and discuss the author’s word choice.

Everything Spring takes the reader through the birth of spring from the budding of new flowers and trees to the birth of new animals.  Through the author’s choice of words, the reader can almost feel as if they are “splish-splashing” through the water with the ducks!

Lesson idea: Read aloud Everything Spring to your kindergarten through 2nd grade students.  Discuss and generate a list of all of the sensory words that you discover.  In a separate session, and as a class, choose a topic.  In a shared writing experience, generate sensory words that describe the topic.  Encourage students to immerse themselves in the topic.  What do they see, smell, feel, taste, hear?  Later, create a shared writing piece using the sensory details.

**Note** I provide these lesson ideas under the assumption that you are familiar with The Six Traits of Writing.  If you are not, and would like more information about teaching students about word choice or any other six traits component, please feel free to contact me at Dlittle[at]linkstoliteracy[dot]com.  I am happy to provide more specific lessons or resources if necessary.

©2010 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Blog Remodel!

Ha!  So, I thought I could quickly remodel my blog with no problems at all!  I’m hoping to get things back up and running tonight!  Please bear with these changes until then. 

Thanks!!   

©2009 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is no additional cost to you.

Literacy Lava 2 Now Available at The Book Chook!

Hi all! Here is a special post about a special product!
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