Flora and the Flamingo by Molly Idle

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A tentative partnership blooms into an unlikely friendship between a girl and a flamingo in this wordless picture book.

Lesson Idea:


Close Reading/Making Inferences: Share Flora and the Flamingo with students. Provide students with sections of the story to “read.” What do they notice? Ask them to make inferences about the section they have. Ask students how words and pictures work together to help us understand what we read. Would words help them understand what is going on in the pictures? How? What emotions do the characters show? How do you know?

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Advertisements

Bluebird by Bob Staake

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A lonely boy meets a special friend in this wordless picture book. A beautiful story of how the friendship is tested.

The Common Core State Standards have placed a lot of emphasis on close reading. Here is a way to teach students how to “read closely” using pictures as a scaffold.

Lesson Idea:


Close Reading/Making Inferences: Share Bluebird with students. Provide students with sections of the story to “read.” What do they notice? Ask them to make inferences about the section they have. Ask students how words and pictures work together to help us understand what we read. Would words help them understand what is going on in the pictures? How?

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroad by Henry Cole

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A young girl’s courage is tested in this hauntingly beautiful, wordless picture book.  Beginning with the parallel between the title (of a wordless book) and the characters (who never speak), Cole has created a gorgeous rendering of the unspoken heroes of the Civil War   

Lesson Idea:  


Mentor Text, Civil War/Character Actions/Wordless Picture Books: Unspoken: A Story From the Underground Railroad can be used as a mentor text for a number of techniques.  As a wordless picture book, discuss how the author conveys the story in pictures only.  How would the story change if words were added?  Analyze the relationship between the characters.  What can you learn about their relationship through pictures only? Most books we read about the Civil War speaks to the hardships of war.  This book speaks to the bravery of every-day people.  Use Unspoken: A Story From the Underground Railroad as part of a unit on the Civil War to see both sides of the issue.  This would also pair well with Henry’s Freedom Box by Ellen Levine or Freedom Song: The Story of Henry “Box” Brown by Sally M. Walker in a unit on bravery during the Civil War.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Tuesday by David Wiesner

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A nearly wordless picture book depicting how frogs behave one Tuesday night. 

Lesson Idea:

Comprehension Strategies


Making Inferences: Read aloud the first half of Tuesday.  As you read aloud, model how to make inferences by inferring what the frogs are doing on this Tuesday night. Explain what an inference is and how they help us understand what we read.   Create a t-chart that has two columns (What the picture shows/Inference).  As you read aloud, model how to fill out the t-chart.  After reading aloud the first half, provide an opportunity for students to work with partners to complete the second half with a t-chart.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Chalk by Bill Thomson

Recommended Grades: 2-5

In this wordless picture book, three children arrive in the park one day to find a bag full of chalk.  Each takes a piece of chalk and draws a picture, which beautifully comes alive in this wonderfully illustrated book.    

Lesson Idea:


Writers Workshop: Share Chalk with your students and discuss the sequencing of the story.  Since there are no words, the author/illustrator must take careful consideration when drawing the story.  The pictures tell the story.  Ask students to create their own wordless picture book paying careful attention to the sequencing of their story.

Model Text/Transition Words:  You can also use the book as a model text.  Use it to model sequencing by writing a sentence for each page using transition words.  Then, have students use a different wordless picture book to practice writing in sequence using transition words.

Other great wordless picture books are Pancakes for Breakfast by Tomie de Paola and Wave by Suzy Lee.  

©2011 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.