Galapagos George by Jean Craighead George

Recommended Grades: 4-6

This is the story of the famous Lonesome George, a giant tortoise who was the last of his species, lived to be one hundred years old, and became known as the rarest creature in the world.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Inquiry: I do not know much about the Galápagos Islands, and I certainly did not know George’s story before reading this. Read aloud Galapagos George as part of an inquiry project on animals or environmental studies. The book takes you through the evolution and adaptation of the species of domed tortoises and saddleback tortoises. If your students are looking for more information, encourage them to check out the informational page at the back of the book.

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

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On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein by Jennifer Berne

Recommended Grades: 4-6

A picture book story of aspects of Einstein’s life, but mostly about how curiosity and wonder shows the powerful difference imagination can make in any life.

Lesson Idea


Mentor Text: Inquiry: Read aloud On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein at the beginning of an inquiry unit. Discuss how Einstein’s curiosity and wonder led him to genius inventions. Use On a Beam of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein as a mentor text when developing inquisitive and curious students through units of inquiry. Pair this with other texts when developing units of inquiry.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Light in the Darkness: A Story about How Slaves Learned in Secret by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Based on historical fact, Rosa and her mother, both slaves, sneak away at night to go to “pit school.”  This is where slaves learn to read and write.  An interesting piece of American history told in a beautifully illustrated story.  

Lesson Idea:  


Content Connections/Inquiry Study: Read aloud Light in the Darkness: A Story about How Slaves Learned in Secret.  Use this book if working on an inquiry unit on slavery or the Civil War. Students could use this as a resource to understand how schooling was not a norm for slaves.  Ask how slaves went about learning how to read when they weren’t allowed.  Pair this book with Words Set Me Free.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Manfish: A Story of Jacques Cousteau by Jennifer Berne

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Jacques was born and raised in France.  As a young boy, he fell in love with the sea.  He longed to become a manfish.  This is a beautiful biography of Jacques Cousteau

Lesson Idea:  


Inquiry Ideas Mentor Text: Read aloud Manfish: A Story of Jacques Cousteau to help students develop ideas for inquiry studies.  In the book, Jacques wonders about the ocean as a child and begins to develop his own resources as a result of his inquiries.  After reading aloud, discuss what Jacques wondered about and what he did to develop answers to his wonders.  Provide time for students to develop a list of wonders in their Wonder Notebooks.

©2013 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Now and Ben: The Modern Inventions of Benjamin Franklin

Recommended Grades: 3-5

A great introduction to the contributions of Benjamin Franklin, many of which are still around today.        

Lesson Idea:  


Writers Workshop: Read aloud Now & Ben: The Modern Inventions of Benjamin Franklin as part of an inquiry unit on inventions.  After introducing students to Franklin’s multiple inventions, encourage them to ask questions to help them find out more about one.  After participating in an inquiry study on their particular invention of choice, ask students to write an informative piece that compares the invention from the past to the invention in the present.

©2012 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.