Violet and Victor Write the Best-Ever Bookworm Book by Alice Kuipers

Recommended Grades: 3-5

Violet Small is on a mission to write the best book ever.  She enlists her twin, Victor’s help, but he’s only interested in worms.  Together, though, Violet and Victor discover the magic of storytelling! 


violet and victorLesson Idea: Mentor Text: Creating Readers and Writers: Read aloud Violet and Victor Write the Best-Ever Bookworm Book to model the magic of storytelling.  Building a collection of books around reading and writing provides model texts for students as they become readers and writers themselves.  Violet and Victor are great characters to encourage the budding writers in your room.

Disclaimer:  I received a copy of this book from Mr. Schu’s blog Watch. Connect. Read  Thanks, Mr. Schu!

©2015 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Earmuffs for Everyone: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs by Meghan McCarthy

Recommended Grades: 4-6

Chester Greenwood didn’t actually invent the earmuffs, but he improved them and received a patent for the design. Today, he is known as the inventor of earmuffs and the state of Maine celebrates him every year on December 21!

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Biography/Author Study: This is another great picture book biography by author Meghan McCarthy. Others include Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum and Daredevil: The Daring Life of Betty Skelton. Read aloud Earmuffs for Everyone!: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs as part of a biography unit or as part of an author study of Meghan McCarthy. Her use of interesting facts in the text and the back matter she shares in her books provides the reader with a great model for nonfiction writing. Our third graders participate in an inquiry study of inventors each year and Earmuffs for Everyone!: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs will be a fantastic resource to add to the study.
©2015 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Exclamation Mark by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Recommended Grades: 1-5

We all have an inner exclamation mark.  The question is, how do we find it?  The story of the exclamation mark and how it took him a little time to figure out what he wanted to say and how to say it.

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Conventions/Finding Your Inner Self:   Exclamation Mark is an excellent mentor text for two very different topics.  On a surface level, use Exclamation Mark as a mentor text when discussing conventions and end marks in particular.  The font size in the text makes for excellent discussion around the use of the exclamation mark.  On a deeper level, the Exclamation Mark is a metaphor for finding your inner self and sharing it with the world.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

I Am Abraham Lincoln by Brad Meltzer

Recommended Grades: 3-5

I am Abraham Lincoln is part of a (fairly) new biography series on people who change the world.  Abraham Lincoln was a kid who stood up to bullies and believed in fairness for everyone. 

Lesson Idea:


Mentor Text: Biography/Persistence:  Read aloud I am Abraham Lincoln (Ordinary People Change World) and discuss how his actions as a child created the adult he became.  How did having the trait of persistence lead to Abraham Lincoln’s prolific political career and guide his core beliefs as a child?

Note to Teachers: While the author provided some photographs as back matter, I’m not entirely sure of the historical accuracy of Abraham Lincoln’s childhood as portrayed in this book.  Use this information as a springboard for a discussion on how to use/determine if information is historically accurate or not.

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson

Recommended Grades: 4-6

 A fence separates the black side of town from the white side of town.  How does the fence bring two little girls together? 

 Lesson Idea:


 Mentor Text: Civil Rights/Character Development: Read aloud The Other Side and discuss how the characters change by the end of the story.  In what ways do the characters grow?  How does the time period effect change?  Discuss the symbolism of the fence.  What can the reader infer?

 

©2014 by Dawn Little for Picture This! Teaching with Picture Books. All Amazon links are affiliate links and may result in my receiving a small commission. This is at no additional cost to you.